The Scarlet Pimpernel

A witty young lady married to a rather frivolous, good-humored Englishman; their trials of affection and devotion set the scene for, "Sink me!  yet another love story. However, when one adds the suspense of a scheming man out to get a mysterious fugitive known to all of England and France as the Scarlet Pimpernel, the story begins to captivate the reader. This is just what Baroness Orczy did when she wrote her novel, The Scarlet Pimpernel. It is set in the time of the French revolution when one's background can mean his doom. The Scarlet Pimpernel is a cunning and wealthy Englishman who, with the help of his trusty league of companions, set out for France to rescue the innocent victims from the vor-acious Madame Guillotine. Lady Marguerite Blakney, a well loved ”and well known ”actress, is our second heroine (along with that mysterious man, of course) in this book and who helps guide us through it. However, the journey is not easy; it consists of numerous conflicts that arise in her marriage, her close relationship with her beloved brother, and the various accounts in which she is put through by the loathsome character, Chauvelin. Her overall conflict, though, would be the issue of trust; her trust in her husband, her trust in her brother, and her trust in the illusive pimpernel.

Marguerite's trust in her husband, Sir Percy Blakney, is pressured throughout the book. At first, when she wishes to turn to him for some emotional support, she is let down because she thinks that he wouldn't be able to understand with that foolish head of his. However, during the climax of the story, Marguerite is forced to refrain from flinging herself into the arms of her dearly beloved husband in order to warn him from serious peril. "He [Chauvelin] rose from the table and dragged a chair to the hearth. Once more Marguerite was terribly tempted to go to him [Sir Percy], for time was ge

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