E-learning

3. Advantages and Disadvantages of E-Learning 7

3.1. Advantages of e-Learning to the Trainer/Organization 7

3.3. Disadvantages to the Trainer or Organization 9

3.4. Disadvantages to the Learner 11

3.5. Do the Benefits Outweigh the Drawbacks? 12

4.1. Computer based training (CBT) 13

The term e-learning may be trendy, but the concept itself has been around for decades. E-Learning is training that takes place through a network, usually over the Internet or a company's intranet. It has its roots in the world of computer-based training that appeared in the early 1980s and used CD-ROMs to teach mostly technical skills to mostly technical people. Lately, e-learning has changed to be a tool widely used in both the academic and corporate worlds. With today's e-learning, companies can train salespeople to use a new product, even if offices are in distributed locations. On the academic front, e-learning allows people to take online courses from universities in various subjects. Some popular and well-known universities around the globe, such as Stanford and Harvard, already offer non-degree courses over the Web, while some other universities offer entire degree programs.

One will find that e-learning is much more flexible than the traditional on-campus university courses as one can study using his/her own computer and the Internet, wherever his/her location. Many online courses allow e-learners to study at their own pace, any place, any time, but within given deadlines. However, some may require e-learners to interact synchronously, that is, in real time, with other colleagues and/or lecturers. Having greater flexibility means e-learners will need to be more motivated, self-disciplined and organized to keep up to date. They will also need to pay close attention to the course timetable and assessment deadlines, as it is their responsibility to meet them. Being responsible for their (e-learners') own le

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