How does Edgar Allen Poe keep the reader in suspense in ‘The

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In our modern world today, we are affected by the many number of stories we hear. But how do the authors of these short stories keep the reader exited and focused? Suspense. Suspense is the type of writing skill authors use to give readers uncertainty about the conclusion of the story. In some stories, the reader may guess the conclusion before they even finish reading the introduction, but when authors add suspense in to their master pieces, the stories become far more interesting and keeps the reader wondering whether if the conclusion of the story would end like they thought it could, and therefore keeps the reader wanting to read more. Edgar Allan Poe is an expert in writing stories full of suspense and uses this particular writing style exceptionally well. "The Tell Tale Heart" is just one of Poe's many masterpieces that possess the ability to keep the reader of the story reading from the beginning of the story to the very end. But how does Edgar Allen Poe keep the reader in suspense in ˜The Tell-Tale Heart'? and how does Edgar Allan Poe use it to manipulate his readers?

The author first led suspense in to his story right at the beginning. He practically started the story by using foreshadowing. Foreshadowing is a very interesting type of literary device. It gives out clues to the reader about the conclusion of the story. Usually it is the character of the story that gives out the clues but from time to time it may vary. Because foreshadowing usually comes in at the very beginning, you may not believe what the character tells you because you do not exactly know what kind of person he is, and if the character is some psychopath, obviously you are not going to believe him. Putting foreshadowing in the beginning of a story is an excellent way to start a story because that way it keeps the reader's attention at the beginning of the story.

Just in the first line, Poe creates suspense by repeating the word ˜very' a

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