Advantages of Immigration

Paper Rating: Word Count: 1815 Approx Pages: 7

The movement by which individuals permanently transfer their place of residence from one country to another is known as immigration. In the early settlement of the United States of America, many people migrated from all over the world to this country. There were no immigration laws or any restrictions on anyone to migrate to this country until 1900s since the United States lacked population problems. As a matter of fact, immigrants, as both laborers and consumers, increased the country's wealth. Having a great deal of immigrants from all around the world, the United States continued its economic and social growth. In the meantime, along with economical, industrial, and technological growth, the United States started having population growth from its own population. Historian Marian L. Smith states, "The Supreme Court declared that regulation of immigration is a Federal responsibility. Thus, as the number of immigrants rose in the 1880s and the economic conditions of some areas worsened, congress began to issue immigration legislation" (1). Unlike two hundred years ago, migrating to this country at the present time is very tough since the immigration law is very strict. The U.S immigration law is one of the most highly regulated immigration laws in the world. Immigration has been a controversial issue in American politics for a long time. Lawmakers have been consistently changing the immigration law. Every time a new immigration law comes out, it comes with some restrictions. Immigration in the National Interest Act of 1995 is one of the immigration policies that cut off employment-based and family-based immigration drastically. Because of all the benefits from the immigrants, the United States should not further restrict legal immigration.

Immigration in the National Interest Act of 1995 cuts off immigration and reduces immigrant's benefits. An article explains that this new policy reduces employment-based ... Continue Reading