Book review Medieval Women

Paper Rating: Word Count: 948 Approx Pages: 4

The book written by Eileen Power entitled Medieval Women was published after here death. She did most of the research in this book. The editor had gathered up all of her information and put it together and made this book. Even though the book was first published in 1975 the ideas that she bought to the table still exist today. The way the book was written it was easy to read and very easy to comprehend what Mrs. Power wanted the reader to get from reading the book.

One of her goals was to "produce a study fuller and better grounded in evidence than any of the existing books on the subject" Her goal was definitely accomplished with this book. I think that her thesis is that she wanted the reader it capture the daily experiences of medieval women. In this book her thesis is very well supported by the examples she used. It made me feel that I was there with that woman following her around while she did her daily activities. For example, "women's work in the labour market in the middle ages was confined to assisting their husbands while they were alive or carrying on their husband's business after their death." Beside her doing all the domestic duties such as cooking, cleaning and taking care of the children a medieval woman had to lend a helping hand to husband in his business. Then after he died she had to attempt to take it on as her own.

As I read the book the author used many different types of sources to get her point across. The one thing that I thought helped out were pictures that were in the book. When reading a chapter with just words it's pretty boring. But this book took a different turn by inserting pictures into the chapters. The pictures went along with the main ideas of each chapter. For instance, "it can be said that throughout the Middle Ages men saw Christ as the divine child; so, not surprisingly, the devotion of the age was lavished upon the mother who held the divine child in her arms" Then direct

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