MOTIVATION AND LEADERSHIP

In the movie Glengarry Glen Ross, David Mamet defines a philosophy of business and life that is all too recognizable to many of us. In the process, Mamet draws a line in the sand, separating the winners from the losers. The Ur-text of business films, in my opinion, is Glengarry Glen Ross. Business leaders wishing to nurture happy, motivated, successful employees need look no further than the film version of David Mamet's play Glengarry Glen Ross . But there is a trick in the story; The trick is to carefully study the words and actions of the managers portrayed here and then do the exact opposite. Listen to these managers' words. Carefully observe their actions. Then say and do exactly the opposite. The main aim of David Mamet in this film is this idea according to me.

At this point, I want to give some brief information about the characters in this film:

Shelley Levene: Played by Jack Lemmon.

John Williamson: Played by Kevin Spacey.

After looking in a general view to this film, I want to explain how we can understand

motivation theories by analyzing the actions of characters in a movie. The core point of the film about motivation is circled in the beginning by Alec Baldwin's speech to the salesmen into a spiral of despair, deception and crime. Baldwin describes new sales

contest. First price is a Cadillac Eldorado. Second prize is a set of steak knives and the third prize is, "you're fired!". The salesmen react in different ways: Al Pacino ignores the threat. Jack Lemmon slouches through the rain like Willy Loman. Ed Harris plots a robbery of the office to steal the good leads. Office manager Kevin Spacey absorbs an amount of verbal abuse from everyone in sight because as a manager, he's isolated from the ruthless law of the jungle that is sale

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