The Enemy

Human beings are complicated as proven by the ability to reason. Thoughtful consideration is often, but not always, used in determining actions. Those actions are driven by motivation. What complicates the decision is that a human may be experiencing internal conflicts, which in turn, may lead to contradicting motives. This was the case with Sadao Hoki in ?The Enemy? by Pearl S. Buck.

In ?The Enemy?, Sadao was a Japanese surgeon who lived in Japan during World War II. Together with his wife, Hana, and the servants, Sadao had a comfortable life. Earlier, he had spent several years in the United States during medical school. While in the United States, Sadao experienced cultural prejudice and bias first hand. Even though he did have a few positive experiences including that of a teacher and landlady Americans did not trust the Japanese and were often cruel to Sadao. When he returned to Japan, Sadao was determined to be the best surgeon and took the hypocratic oath seriously. However, his experiences with bias didn?t easily leave him, and when World War II started, Sadao experienced the hatred of his beloved country?s foe.

One day, an American soldier washed ashore on Sadao?s property. The soldier was badly wounded, and Sadao was immediately faced with an internal conflict. He struggled with the belief that as a surgeon, he should do whatever he could to save a man?s life. Conversely, the American was the enemy, and as a good Japanese citizen, Sadao should turn him over to the authorities. The conflicting values led to seemingly opposing motives.

Sadao?s motivation to save a human was overwhelming. Even though his servants left and his wife was afraid, Sadao needed to use the skill for which he trained. He was able to block out all other concerns once he decided that a man was a man, regardless of nationality. The American survived. Afterwar

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