British vs. Colonists at the Beginning of the Revolutionary

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As the Revolutionary War began, both the British and the Colonists had many strengths and

weaknesses that could either lead them to glorious victory or wretched defeat. Like in basketball, it started off being anybody's game. However, the victory was up to the side that could

manipulate the other sides weaknesses as well as racking up points with their own strengths.

Britain had a good army, a superior navy to anyone else at the time, and, even with the

debt from the French and Indian War, they had an established and prosperous economy. The British had a fairly large professional army that consisted of 50,000 trained troops. Along with

their professional army, the British were also able to pay for the service of 30,000 Hessians. After the victory of the British in the French and Indian War, they were able to get help from their Indian allies as well. Even some 50,000 Loyalists from the colonies even enrolled to help the

British army. So it's easy to see that the British had a strong, large, and well trained army.

However, the British army wasn't unstoppable.

The British, despite the strong army, had many weaknesses. The British at the same had

other events to keep their eye on other than the colonies. They had to detach troops to keep

control in Ireland. The British also had to keep an eye on France, who wanted to stab them in the

back after the French & Indian War. Due to the many enemies they had at the time, the

government in London was "confused and inept . There was also internal conflict since many

Britons didn't want to fight their American "cousins.  Another disadvantage that the colonists

would be able to exploit is the fact that the British had second-rate generals instead of good

leaders like William Pitt. The soldiers were brutally treated. Also the 3,000 mile separation added

to delays, uncertainties, and old useless or

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