Veterans Day

The beginning of the story of Veterans Day started on November 11, 1918. The Great War (World War I) had just come to an end when allied powers signed a cease-fire agreement other wise known as an armistice. To commemorate the end of the "war to end all wars  November 11 became know as Armistice Day after the armistice that was signed to insure peace. It became officially recognized as Veterans Day in 1962 through a Congressional resolution. It wasn't until about 12 years later that it became a national holiday. More than 20 years passed until it would be recognized as a federal holiday.

During the Great War over 100 thousand people lost their lives. In 1921, an unknown American soldier of WWI was laid to rest in the Arlington National Cemetery of Virginia. Many people came to the burial and military ceremony that was performed for the unknown soldiers to honor him and all the other soldiers that sacrificed their lives during the war. The tomb the soldier was buried in appropriately became know as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

America is not the only country who has a "Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers . Many other countries have memorials to remember their brave soldiers. France calls their tomb of the unknowns the Arc de Triomphe. They also call November 11, Armistice Day. Canada recently built a tomb of the unknowns and buried a Canadian soldier that been buried in France ever since the Great War.

Contrary to what many people thought at the time, the War to End All Wars was not the last war America would fight. Over four hundred thousand soldiers died in WWII after the declaration of Armistice Day.

In 1953, people of Eumphoria, Kansas started to call November 11, Veterans Day to honor veterans of all wars, not just those of WWI. The rest of the nation took note and the idea quickly caught on. One year later, thanks to Representative of Kansas, Edwin R. Rees, President Eisenhower si

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