Wuthering Heights

Paper Rating: Word Count: 2329 Approx Pages: 9

When reading the student paper about the Bronte sisters life. I noticed that the way Emily acted toward her brother is similar to the way her character Mrs. Dean originally treats Heathcliff. As well as the comparison with Emily's actions and young Catherine's, I can also see a bit of Heathcliff in our author as well.

Robert Low offers the following questions for you to ponder and write about in your journal:

Are any of the female characters masochistic? Is this self-cruelty physical or mental? What does this self-torture have to do with their imprisonment?

The impression I receive from Cathy Heathcliff is slightly masochistic. The self-cruelty she displays is mental. This self-torture has a lot to do with her imprisonment. I feel she is an example of the Female Gothic, locked in but the hero-villain. Her mental put-downs are a result of Heathcliff's cruelty as well as a feeling of hopelessness and that she will never be able to escape this life that has been forced upon her. I think that that is also a reason why she doesn't leave Wuthering Heights.

How does Catherine Earnshaw attempt to transcend her boundaries of self?

She tries to be more adventurous and is able to transcend the traditional boundaries placed upon her by her brother and society by bonding with Heathcliff. I'm sure her adventures upon the grange and outdoors weren't typical of those girls her age. She also expands her boundaries while at the Lintons avoiding "wildness  and becoming more civilized according to societies suggestions. It is at Thrushcross Grange that she becomes a "lady. 

What "feminization" occurred within Wuthering Heights while Heathcliff was away? How was it a threat to Heathcliff?

While Heathcliff was away Catherine marries Edgar Linton and moves to Thruscross Grange. Mrs. Dean goes with Catherine and Hindley, Joseph, and Earnshaw are left alone in the dreary Wuthering Heights. At Thruscro

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