Poem Comparison

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There are many African American writers that are well known today, that have made there works strictly around the focus point of black life. The three works chosen to compare and demonstrate the similarities and connections between three different writers are, August Wilson's play "Lessons Carved From History", Amiri Baraka's poem "Ka'Ba", and Langston Hughes' poem "Children's Rhyme". Each of them have a similar connection which is they all revolve around the issue of black life, and each writer is trying to demonstrate and make a point that black people did not have it easy, and were not given all the rights they deserved and were entitled to.

August Wilson, who was born Frederick August Kittel in 1945,to father Frederick August, and Daisy (Wilson) Kittel.Wilson's father who was German-American was a baker, and his mother who was African-American, was a cleaning woman. Wilson dropped out of school at the age of 15, and received his education from libraries, and street corner readings. His carrers consisted of, a Writer, Cofounder (with Rob Penny), scriptwriter, and director of Black Horizons on the Hill (theatre company) Pittsburgh, PA, 1968-78; scriptwriter for Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, 1979. A few of his accomplishments consist of, Award for best play of 1984-85 from New York Drama Critics Circle, 1985, Antoinette Perry ("Tony") Award nomination from League of New York Theatres and Producers, 1985, and Whiting Writers' Award from the Whiting Foundation, 1986, all for Ma Rainey's Black Bottom; Outstanding Play Award from American Theatre Critics, 1986, American Theatre Critics Outstanding Play Award, and Pulitzer Prize for drama, all 1990, all for The Piano Lesson; Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame Award, 1991; Antoinette Perry Award nomination for best play, and American Theatre Critics' Association Award, both 1992, both for Two Trains Running; Clarence Muse Award, 1992; recipient of

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