PS2 vs Gamecube

Paper Rating: Word Count: 640 Approx Pages: 3

Video games have become immensely popular over recent years. This fact forms a strict competition between home console developing companies. I'm going to discuss two leading companies, Sony and Nintendo. By reviewing their features, design, price, variety of games, and accessories, the reader will have an accurate understanding of their similarities and differences. Lets start by comparing the features of the PS2 and Gamecube.

The PS2 came out in October of 2000. It featured DVD capability as well as the ability to play old PS1 games. This was important for their sales for the fact that the PS1 was so popular and DVD sales were on the rise. The PS2 also has online capabilities, which is a big part of the future of video games.

The Gamecube, that debut in November of 2001, had decided to focus on the compatibility aspect with other Nintendo products as well as their online capabilities. The Gamecube can connect into the Gameboy Advance for added benefit. An example would be that before you would have both teams' playbooks visible on the screen for a football game. Now with the Gameboy Advance plugged in the playbooks only show up on that screen for privacy. The Gamecube plays only 3-inch discs, which doesn't allow it to run DVD movies but allows for a more compact design. Another feature of the Gamecube is that it has 4 controller ports already built in for multi-player games. Lets move on to the design of the consoles.

The PS2 has a sleek design, which gives it an edgy look. There's a vertical stand available that can also store games to give you more space, which can be helpful in a crowded entertainment center. There is an empty space built in to the PS2 where the hard drive and network adapter go. The hard drive will let gamers download games from an Internet service and play on a faster scale.

The Gamecube has a design, which is exactly that, a cube. It also has a built in handle for ea

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