Good Morning Vietnam

Paper Rating: Word Count: 899 Approx Pages: 4

The movie "Good Morning, Vietnam  Directed by Barry Levinson and written by Mitch Markowitz Had a solid view, that was portrayed in many ways, on the roles of the North Vietnamese, South Vietnamese, and American Soldiers. It also depicted a clear picture of the Vietnamese Civilians and Viet Cong. The film began with a clear-cut portrayal of American Soldiers within the confounds of an office, and the discrepancies amongst the high ranking and higher ranking Officers. Robin Williams is introduced into the Movie as a humorous man meant to be a radio DJ for the American Soldiers fighting ˜outside the Office'. The high-ranking officials in charge of the News broadcastings limited Adrian Cronauer (played by Robin Williams) to broadcast the most mild of new about the war to the soldiers; the very same soldiers who were fighting the war. In this was, the film maker practically hands over to the audience the fact that high ranking officials wanted to virtually blind-sight listeners into thinking that the war is only being fought in the hills ¦that it is, in fact, not real to them, but very distant. By doing this he shows how, by using propaganda, the news controlled out view [American view] and the soldier's views on the war that we were fighting. Misleading the masses to believe what the handful of major leaders felt was necessary for the masses to believe by keeping them mal-informed and blissfully ignorant of the actual situations at hand. Along with the portrayal of misconception within the confounds of the Vietnam War, the filmmaker successfully was able to serve the audience with the sight of individuals within each army confound. He created the antithesis of the ˜faceless mass propaganda' that Dictators such as Hitler used to create a subhuman tag for their targets. Consider the fact that when a student reads about mass casualties in a war, decades before their time, they only see the num

This Essay is Approved by Our Editor

Page 1 of 4 Next >

Related Essays