Newspaper Importance

In a time when information is available to anyone at the push of a button, a turn of the dial, and now, the click of a mouse, newspapers have had to adapt in order to continue to please and inform their audiences. Due to the continuing change of views and preferences of our society, newspapers have taken on different roles in order to satisfy these changes. The New York Times, The Star Tribune, The Twin Cities' City Pages, and the Asian Pages are examples of different types of newspapers with different styles of providing information. Each of these papers covers certain events and issues in certain ways, thus making each paper appeal to a specific audience.

The New York Times began its power when Adolph Ochs, the owner of the Chattanooga Times in 1878, invested $75,000 in the struggling Times. Ochs built his paper around covering substantial news, paying less attention to entertainment news and sensationalistic writing. With this approach, along with lowering the price of the Times to a penny, the Times grew to be fourth largest daily newspaper in the United States with over 1,000,000 daily copies in circulation in 1998.

The Times is a national conflict-orientated newspaper. A conflict-orientated newspaper, according to Richard Campbell in his book, Media and Culture, is defined primarily as a paper that "covers events, issues, or experiences that deviate from social norms.  Along with this style of reporting, the Times does not dangle in the realm of the fancy. The front page of each section is neatly composed of several columns of articles with very few pictures to accompany those articles. The emphasis is on informing the public of the news and the news only, using straight forward, objective reporting.

With these things in mind, the Times can be recognized as a paper written for a highly educated, upper-class individual. Because of this generalization, the paper has a high cultural appeal, so th

Page 1 of 6 Next >

Related Essays