The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter

Paper Rating: Word Count: 615 Approx Pages: 2

Born in Columbus, Georgia, McCullers grew up in a comfortable setting, for her father was a well-to-do watchmaker and jeweler. Since her childhood, McCullers has been full of creativity, demonstrated through both music and literature. As she aged and matured, writing became her true love and she established herself as a mainstream southern Gothic author when she wrote The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. This title accurately describes the theme of the novel and depicts man' never ending quest for love and acceptance. Loneliness, racism, and injustice dominate this 20th century post-war novel.

In the beginning of the story two deaf-mutes, John Singer and Antopolous, share a strong relationship in which John is constantly taking care of his friend. But the two companions are separated when Antopolous is admitted to a mental institution. When this relationship is severed, John moves to a small Southern town where he meets a young tomboy named Mckelly, Jack Blunt, a boisterous drunk, Biff Brennan, a lonely café entrepreneur, and Dr. Copeland, an African American physician who is intelligent yet closed minded. All of these characters are spellbound by John Singer's apparent serenity and spirit in such a depressing and stressful world. Seeking wisdom and happiness, these characters are intrigued by this disabled man and each form their own special bond with him. As these characters spend increasingly more time with John, they are able to find answers to their problems, but selfishly only continue to visit him, because he serves as a solution to their loneliness. In the end John Singer is the only character left unhappy, and when he learns that his best friend in the mental institution has died, life itself becomes meaningless and driving him to commit suicide.

In the Heart is A Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers illustrates many different kinds of loneliness in each of the four main characters and focuses individua

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