4 Theories of Mythology

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There are four basic theories in mythology. These theories are the rational myth theory, the functional myth theory, the structural myth theory, and the psychological myth theory. The rational myth theory states that myths are created to explain natural events and forces. Functional myths are a type of myths that are created as a kind of social control. The structural myth theory states that myths are patterned after the human mind as well as human nature. The psychological myth states that myths are created based on human emotion.

Rational myth theory states that myths are made to better understand natural events and forces that occur in the everyday lives of people. This theory also explains that gods and goddesses controlled all of these happenings of nature. Creation myths from different cultures are all examples of rational myths. They explain how man was created and explain what god and goddesses used and what actions they took to create human beings. These myths also tell what substances were used in order for man to exist. The existence of man is a natural event but creation myths give other explanations, which rationalize existence and other occurrences.

The functional myth theory talks about how myths were used to teach morality to people as well as normal social behavior. Myths in this category involve crime and punishment on the level of both gods and of normal people living in a community. The functional myth theory also states that myths are created for social control and serve the function of insuring stability in society. An example of a functional myth is the story of Amaterasu, a goddess who is visited by her brother in her kingdom. When she hears of her brothers visit she is worried he will try to take over her kingdom and arms herself to fight him, however, they do not fight. She allows her brother to stay in her kingdom until he ruins parts of it and entirely wears

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