Apartheid in South Africa

Paper Rating: Word Count: 1747 Approx Pages: 7

Form Basil's point of view, "South Africa belongs to all who live in it, black and white, and that no government can justly claim authority unless it is based on the will of the people  (5). This idea of equality was the foundation in South Africa. Unfortunately when the Dutch came to South Africa they formed a system called apartheid. Apartheid was a system that kept racial segregation, and gave the white power to rule over the other races. Even though the blacks tried to stop it the whites gained more power. Then came the effects that covered every aspect of their life including education, work and property. After all that the black people started protesting, but their attempted solution did not quite work. Finally apartheid came to an ending in the spring in 1994, but what is happening now? Apartheid is a social injustice because it brought suffering to non-white people and it took away their rights to freedom.

One main cause that began apartheid was when the English and the Dutch in hope to find diamonds colonized South Africa. According to The End of Apartheid in South Africa, "Ever since the first Dutch settlers arrived in South Africa in the seventeenth century, the country has been reaping a bitter harvest sown in greed, hatred, and racism  (Pratt, 7). Apartheid was instigated by all the anger and hatred that the Dutch settlers created. In 1940 the Afrikaner National Party gained power, and then they created the system known as apartheid. The strategist National Party invented apartheid as a way to hold control over economic and social system. However their initial aim was to maintain white power, and have racial separation. Because of the Dutch, apartheid was invented in South Africa, and that caused conflicts between races.

Another cause of apartheid was that the government gave power to the white people even though there were more black people. Davidson reports that blacks constituted 69% of the population

Page 1 of 7 Next >

Related Essays