Jackson Administration

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"The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee

Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a

reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the

1790's than a change in that policy." This can be proven by examining the administration of Jackson on the nation policy of Indians, and comparing it to the administrations of other previous presidents. Around 1826, the federal government tried to remove all Indians to the West. The Cherokee Indians of northwestern Georgia feared removal and objected to the Supreme Court. In Worcester vs. Georgia, the Court ruled that they were a "sovereign nation", and not subject to the laws of Georgia. Jackson did not agree with the decision, and did not enforce the decision by John Marshall. He persuaded the tribe to cede the land in Georgia, and travel west of the Mississippi.

According to the map of Territorial Cessions Made by the Cherokees, a considerable amount of land had been acquired from the Cherokee Indians by many treaties of Washington, Monroe, and Jefferson administrations. Jackson followed them with the acquiring of more Cherokee lands.

According to Henry Knox, secretary of war of Washington's administration, there are two ways to quiet the disturbances on the frontier. "The first of which is by raising an army, and [destroying the resisting] tribes entirely or 2ndly by forming treaties of peace with them.  Knox wants to gain land for the United States, but does not believe the United States has the right to use force because it cannot be taken away from them unless by their free consent, or by the right of conquest in case of a just war. 

During the Treaty of Holston on July 2, 1791, Knox stated, "That the

Cherokee Nation may be led to a greater degree of civilization, and to

become herdsmen and cultivators, instead of remaining in a state of

hunters, the Unit

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