True Grit

The Last Flight, an Autobiography by Amelia Earhart, arranged by her husband, George Putnam, is a curious and thought provoking mystery. I chose this book for two reasons. First,the mystery of what happened to Amelia Earhart has never been solved. She was purported to have been captured by Japanese soldiers in the Pacific, just prior to world war II. She was imprisoned and later executed as an American spy, on the Island of Saipan. I had lived on Saipan for a few years. The prison where Amelia was held was just two blocks from where my dad practiced as a veterinarian. I have heard this mystery over time from my own parents, and was curious as to what really happened to this adventurous and brave pilot

Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas. She was the

daughter of Amy Otis and Edwin Earhart. Amelia had one other younger sister, Muriel. Amelia's

grandparents were well-to-do, leading citizens of Atchison, Kansas. Her father, however, was a

failed lawyer who could not make it financially. Amelia and her sister was left to the care of her

grandparents, the first 10 years of her life. Her own parents left Kansas to accept a job in Des

Moines, Iowa. Through her wealthy grandparents, Amelia was given privilege and wealth,

attending private schools and enjoying many of the comforts of life. In 1908, she and her sister

moved to Des Moine to join her parents.

A few year later, her parents moved to California. On one occasion, Amelia's father took

her to an aerial meet at Daugherty Field in Long Beach. It was there that she became very

interested in flying. The next day she had her first experience in flying. She was given a helmet

and goggles, and boarded an open-cockpit biplane for a 10-minute flight over Los Angeles.

"As soon as we left the ground I knew I myself had to fly! 

After that Daugherty Field experience

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