Comparison of a passage and a poem

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Both passages, a poem and a memoir show significant child experiences in a library. Although their experiences are different, the books they find provide new glimpses into a surprising and unexpected world. In both passages, the authors prove why it is important for children to read and discover new things. They use characterization, point of view, and theme to convey why it is important to read.

The thoughts of the characters in both passages show why it is important to read. In passage one, the author, Anne Dillard says how she is astonished that anyone lives a fine life that consists of going into the "field  and doing work in a stream or a pond. She wished she would have the freedom of it. She wanted to write to the author of the book The Field Book of Ponds and Streams, she wanted to assure the author that someone had found the book and enjoyed it. She wanted to know where she herself could find a pond or stream in the Homewood area. Through characterization we learn about the character's views on the biologists work in the ponds. In passage two, the author, Rita Dove has a slightly different approach to her writing. She tells the audience about her dedication to reading. How she wants to find out about the entire world through books. As she says in line 39 "All the time in the world was there, and sometimes all the world on a single page. As much as I could hold on my plastic card's imprint I took greedily; six books, six volumes of bliss, the stuff we humans are made of.  This shows what the author thinks about the books and reading. Through characterization both Dillard and Dove show the impact of their childhood readings on their lives.

Another pivotal angle to consider is the use of point of view in both passages. The first person point of view in both the memoir and the poem show why reading is important to child development. In passage one, Dillard depicts the adu

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