Sex Education

Teens today are faced with the mass media advocating sex subliminally, while our education systems stress abstinence. It is all too fishy. Since Mary Ware Dennett's essay for her two sons in 1915 , to set facts from fiction, times have changed in the ways we communicate to our children about "how babies are born . With access to over a thousand websites on the web and pictures that scream of sex research (and content, might I add) to answer all of their unanswered questions, the topic is readily available to the young and adolescents. The information collected by the mind of a child can influence what he or she may posses psychologically in their future.

Like they say, "Curiosity kills the cat!  As such a touchy subject might be, it would be straightforward to say that teens and children alike are getting mixed messages these days. One concern of parents is: teaching their children how to make decisions, watching them make one is another. Schools are helping to teach children the basics of childbearing and sexual education. This subject may be the most controversial of them all. Nonetheless, it is one of the most important types of information that adolescence (and preadolescence) will learn in their school career.

Sexuality education help lower the risks of teen pregnancies and the spread of disease. The purpose of this paper is to identify the main aspects behind sexual education in our school-based programs in the present. But is our education system really working as hard and effectively as our society would like them to?

There are two main ideas behind sexual education, the prevention of STDs and teen pregnancies5. Though, the rate of teen pregnancies has dropped, it is accepted into the lives of over one million women each year2. STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) are most common in the United States, affecting 30 million people2. Since 1981, when AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndro

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