Womens Sufferage

Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt were fighting for the same women's rights in the mid 1900's but they were nothing a like.

Alice Paul was a radical Quaker who lead the more militant suffragists. She add an unseen energy to her movement. She had spent years earlier in England where she had worked with the more militant suffragist, Emily Pankherst. In 1913 she returned to the United States she established the Congressional Union within the NAWSA to lobby for a federal amendment. Paul became impatient with the slow pace and joined forces with western women voters to form the more militant National Women's Party. This party had a more aggressive and dramatic tactics that the United States had not seen from a suffragist group.

Paul and about 200 other women protested at Wilson's inaugural condemning the president and democrats for failing to produce a amendment supporting their movement. Alice Paul and all 200 women were sent to prison. That summer they chained them selves to the white house fence after attempting to scale it. After their arrest, they were strip searched and place with the other criminals in jail. Paul reacted by going on a hunger strike while in jail. This in jail strike created a lot of sympathy and the much needed publicity for the militant group. Paul had finally started to get Wilson's attention.

Carrie Chapman Catt was a composed woman who married into her wealth. She was a school teacher who made her move in women's right when she was elected to the school board. She had recently re-married when she first became involved in the women's suffrage movement. She lived separate from her new husband for four months so she could deticate herself to the NAWSA. In 1915 she became President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Before the NAWSA was under her leadership most suffrage activists opposed the war, now they were behind it 100 percent. This support do

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