Jazz

The Harlem Renaissance was an era full of life, excitement, and activity. The world in all aspects was in gradual recovery from the depression. The world of music was expanding, sharing it's enthusiasm throughout the world. The evolution of jazz aroused the curiosity of the nation. As Blacks received their freedom, they were able to express themselves as talented individuals. Certain blacks contributed immensely to the era of jazz, for example, Duke Ellington. Ellington entered a brand-new, exciting era as he grew up. As Ellington became an adolescent, the entertainment world was undergoing rapid, change. The change was driven by the deep, persuasive shift in the American spirit. The country was anxious to recover what it lost during the Depression. Ellington's jazz creations were unknown and alien to the world, however, Ellington received the chance to succeed at the Cotton Club. The results of Ellington's achievements at the Cotton Club were extensive, leading him to success and to national fame. The reasons for his outcome need to be revealed because Ellington was one of the most important figures in the era of jazz. During the Harlem Renaissance, some of the clubs were segregated and some mixed. The Cotton Club's patrons were mostly whites and the club employed mostly blacks. The Cotton Club was the centerpiece of New York's entertainment business. It was the springboard to fame for many singer, dancers, and performers and was indeed the board Ellington jumped from. The club management decided what audiences wanted to see in their clubs. As a result of the Harlem Renaissance and the growing interest in black entertainment, audiences enjoyed watching the many talented black performers. To have such a name as the Cotton Club brings to mind images of the Old South. Ellington auditioned at the Cotton Club because he found it to be an opportunity that he would most likely never stumble upon again. In December 1927, Ellington presented o

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