The Treatment Of Slaves and Servants in Early America

During the early years, when the colonies were fresh and new, there was

a necessitate for people to do the labor required to make the colonies function

and flourish. This lead to a scarcity to labor in the English colonies, which lead

to the exercise of "unfree  labor. In the start of the labor shortage, indentured

servitude was popular, then later on slavery became more vastly popular.

Labor was necessary for various aspects of the lives of the colonists. In

the southern colonies a great deal of labor was needed for the harvesting of

tobacco. The first colonists to come over to the Americas contracted to seven

years of labor and in return, they would receive a share of the profit. When their

contracts expired, there was scarcely any profit. Seeing as no one was attracted

to coming over, the London Company stated a "dividend  of the land to those

who were still animate. Each colonist received 100 acres. The London Company

began to rely on these grants to aid their labor and capital deficiency.

This all lead to the headright system, which went on to lead to the

indentured servant system. This system was established to bring together the

colonist who desired more land and labor, and people who wanted to get to

America. The way this system worked was, that in return for being transported

over to America, the servant agreed to work for a declared amount of time for

Indentured servants did not have complete political and civil rights.

Basically, their master could discipline them however they wanted. Whether it be

verbally or physically. The masters could ill-treat their servants to keep them in

line. Though, servants could sue for the abuse.

The indentured servants became free when they finished their years of

work. After their years are complete, they are free. Over half of

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