Causes and Effects of Speeding

Many drivers these days would probably agree that there's a "need for speed  on roadways everywhere. There's always people running late for appointments, rebellious teen drivers, and fast sports cars who think they have the right to go faster than what the law prohibits. It's not until they're caught that they realize they're no more important than the rest of the drivers on the road. Speeding is a very customary way for drivers to break the law. Breaking any law usually leads to unpleasant consequences, but breaking a law speeding can lead to many consequences. Speeding can cause a driver to receive a ticket, go to court, attend traffic school, and on top of that, make their insurance rates rise.

Receiving a speeding ticket can be rather frustrating. A ticket can become profoundly expensive depending on how fast the driver was traveling. A driver can be charged anywhere from ten to twenty dollars for every mile per hour driven over the speed limit. The price adds up fast. Drivers have the choice to fight their fine in court rather than pay the fine, and many do. If the driver decides to do this, the officer assigns them a date in court.

Drivers who take their fine to court normally do so because they disagree with the reason they were pulled over or believe they have a justifiable explanation for speeding. A driver who goes to court usually ends up paying the fine they received in the beginning along with court fees. After seeing a judge the pain and suffering may be over, but there's a good chance the judge will require the driver to attend traffic school.

Traffic school helps to show drivers why speeding is harmful, and to improve their driving habits. Along with enduring the nine hour class, a driver sent to attend traffic school must pay for it also. If given the choice, most people would never take this class. Many people think once the

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