Pearl Harbor

Paper Rating: Word Count: 1382 Approx Pages: 6

"Yesterday, Dec. 7, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan. 

These opening words of President Roosevelt on December 8, 1941 have stuck with me since the first day I heard them. I have always been intrigued about the attack on Pearl Harbor. I feel that the attack should never have happened. In this paper I intend to prove that the actions of the U.S. government provoked and did not stop the attack on Pearl Harbor.

First, I would like to talk about the reactions of the attack. The surprise attack on Pearl Harbor was completely well thought out. Japanese aircraft carriers launched plane from 274 miles away from Pearl Harbor. The attacking Japanese planes came in two separate waves. The first set of bombers hit at 7:53 AM. The second wave came through at 8:55. By 9:55AM the entire attack was over leaving behind 2,403 dead, 188 destroyed planes and 8 damaged or destroyed battleships. In a sense they crippled the entire Pacific Fleet of the United States. The following day, December 8th, President Roosevelt went to congress and asked permission to declare war on the Empire of Japan. Permission was granted and FDR signed the declaration of war. On December 9th Japan, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States. By declaring war on the Japan the U.S. had, in fact, just joined World War II.

These facts I have just stated you can go on any web sit, any text book, or any book to find out. What you will not hear is that the United States had forced the attack. The Empire of Japan depended on the United States for trade goods, mainly oil, to assist their economy war efforts. But, the United States froze that trading and cutting off Japan's oil supply. This crippled Japans economy leaving them flat and angered. The United States was the last country to join the War, yet, there were a series of things tha

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