inductive

There are many forms of argumentation all over the world. Although they are different, there is not one that is considered to be better than the other. Many cultures use different argument forms such as using authoritative reasons, opinions of the majority, or historical precedents. Deductive reasoning uses accepted facts to write a logical argument. Inductive reasoning does not result with a definite conclusion like deductive reasoning does, but rather is based on past opinion and observations of others.

Deductive reasoning applies what is known. It begins with a general belief, and concludes with a specific statement which is either true or false. Deductive reasoning is more dependable than inductive reasoning, and is considered to make stronger arguments because the conclusion has a certain answer; true or false.

Plato, Aristotle, and Socrates were a few of the people who influenced the mathematical approach to thinking such as: if A=B, and B=C, then A=C. Sentences like the previous example, are constructed in an argument form called a syllogism. A syllogism is made up of two statements which relate, resulting with a final conclusion that is determined from those two premises. In the West, this deductive way of thinking has become known as common sense. However, many cultures around the world use different argument forms.

Inductive reasoning is not like deductive reasoning, for it is used to discover new information by using observations, rather than using evidence to conclude with facts. The argument begins with certain observations and concludes with a general claim which can either be considered reliable or unreliable. It does not give a definite answer but tells how likely it is that the conclusion is true. The conclusion is based on the quality and quantity of the given evidence and observations. Therefore, by using deductive reasoning, there will always be a stronger argument than if inductive reasoning was

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