The Treaty of Versailles

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The Treaty Of Versailles played an important part in world history. For one it was when the big three being Georges Clemenceau, Woodrow Wilson And David Lloyd George all came together to fight Germany. This was also when they saw what they were getting out of the treaty.

The main terms of The Treaty Of Versailles were as follows these following things had to be agreed if the treaty was to go ahead, War guilt clause which Germany had to accept, Reparations which also worked out in the big threes favour Germany would have to pay out 66.0 Billion pounds. Next was Germanys territories and colonies this meant that Germany had to give up a lot of land. Then there was Germanys armed forces this meant that Germany had to be limited in ships men e.g. Germany could only have 100,000 men. Lastly but by no means least there was a League Of Nations started by Woodrow Wilson this meant that only if Germany agreed to all the terms of the treaty and kept the peace in all of the countries they would be invited to the League Of Nations.

Georges Clemenceau did reasonably well in the treaty. He was satisfied with most things that happened in the treaty.

Georges Clemenceau was extremely happy when he found out that his country was getting Alsace Lorraine back. Alsace Lorraine had been won by Germany in an earlier war; to be getting this back was an extremely happy and proud moment for Georges Clemenceau.The Saarland was a piece of land connected to Alsace Lorraine Georges Clemenceau was quite livid when he found out that it would not be going to him it would be given to the League Of Nations also a Plebiscite was going to be held there after 15 years. Of coarse Georges was not happy but he did give it up eventually. He was very annoyed about this because he thought that he had the right to own that land and run it as they please. The Rhineland was a thin strip of land that separated Germany And France. All that Georges Clemenceau wanted t

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